Create a Logo

  • Do some research and see what logos resonate with you. Also, what logos do you dislike? What do your competitors’ logos look like? It’s important for both the client and designer to have clear insight into competitors’ styles so a logo may be developed that’s different from your competition.
  • This is very important because based on how you describe your business or products, designers can decide which direction to go in.
  • Do some research and see what logos resonate with you. Also, what logos do you dislike? What do your competitors’ logos look like? It’s important for both the client and designer to have clear insight into competitors’ styles so a logo may be developed that’s different from your competition. Upload pictures below or paste URLs of images you like
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  • Describe what your brand should say about your company. What message should it convey?
  • Take a look at your competitors’ logos and brands. Figure out what shapes and colors are commonly used. It’s very important to consult with your designer so they can create distinctive logo designs. After all, you want to stand out from your competitors.
  • Every company has an age demographic they’re trying to reach (even if they don’t say so publicly). For example, Apple focuses on younger people, while Rolls-Royce targets an older audience.
  • It’s important for a logo designer to understand the client’s preferences—especially if there’s no existing brand guidance to work off of. This is when a designer can explain color usage for various industries. Your designer may use a previous study of your competition and their brand color palettes.
  • Like colors, fonts convey and inspire emotion. Your designer should know the differences between the four main font types: serif, sans serif, script, and decorative. Fonts may be selected to match a business’s service or product. For example, a logo for a legal firm, which should convey truth, honor, strength, and justice, might be best represented with a bold, straightforward font free of curls and swirls. On the other hand, logos for cosmetic products often use thin, gentle fonts.
  • If your logo needs to include a tagline, the designer will usually need to combine two fonts. This should be done carefully. Rules must be set for font size, such as when a logo is used by itself and when the logo is used with a slogan.
  • What brands resonate with you? Are there any brands you dislike? Providing examples can help streamline the process and help your designer create options that work best for your company.
  • As I said in the beginning, logo design is a science and an art. Answering these 10 questions enables a designer to formulate the science that, in turn, supports the art. Why? Because art can’t be forced.